Justice Stevens Slips One Under the Radar — Regarding “Shakespeare”

John Paul Stevens, the former Supreme Court justice, is an Oxfordian — one who believes that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (1550-1604) used “William Shakespeare” as a pen name from 1593 onward; and in the Book Review of the New York Times last Sunday, April 6, where he was interviewed for the By the Book page, he must have had a twinkle in his eye during a couple of his replies:

John Paul Stevens

John Paul Stevens

Whom do you consider your literary heroes?

“The author of the plays attributed to William Shakespeare …”

You’re hosting a literary dinner party. Which three writers are invited?

“Samuel Clemens, Charles Dickens and the author of the Shakespeare canon…”

Well, now, the interviewer might have interrupted him to ask, “And who was that author?”

They went to the trouble of making the two lines, to make a space for the author's name, but then they left the space blank...

They went to the trouble of making the two lines, to make the usual space for the author’s name, but then they left the space blank…

In any case, Justice Stevens has given the rest of us (Oxfordians) a fine way of referring to Edward de Vere without getting caught on the radar screen.

... like the name in this space, in 1613, with initials S. P. for Samuel Page...

… like the name in this space, in 1613, with initials S. P. for Samuel Page…

And maybe it’ll catch on:

Who’s your favorite poet?

“Oh, well, I like the author of Shake-speares Sonnets, you know, the real writer, whose name should have gone between those parallel lines…”

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